Dr. Kimberly Juhlin wanted a profession where she would be able to use her head, her hands, and help people and animals.

“I also loved the fact that there are always new things to learn in the veterinary profession,” Dr. Juhlin said.

Though she started out in agriculture, having earned her undergraduate degree in the subject from the University of Illinois, she eventually made her way to veterinary medicine. She became an honor graduate from Veterinary School at Massey University in New Zealand, where she developed an interest in critical care. Dr. Juhlin became heavily involved in an intensive care unit for foals—the experience solidified her passion and set her on a path to becoming a veterinarian.

She practiced in clinics for the first 31 years of her career, then she discovered Airvet. As an Airvet relief veterinarian since March 2020, Dr. Juhlin has taken nearly 300 cases. She sees Airvet as a wonderful way to help pet parents and their fur kids from anywhere in the world—even Arabia! 

“I became a relief veterinarian so that I had more freedom to take time away to visit my family. I have the best quality of life I have ever had,” Dr. Juhlin said. “I get to create my own schedule as a relief vet and Airvet is always on in the background. I take all the calls I can, which varies from day to day.”

One of her most interesting cases on Airvet was a 2-year-old small breed dog that developed unusually marked lethargy and weakness after running around the yard doing the “zoomies” for 15 minutes.

During her time at Vale Park Animal Hospital in Valparaiso, Ind., Dr. Juhlin began to focus on alleviating pain in animals. There was only one pain reliever available at the time, Rimadyl, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, but Dr. Juhlin wanted to do more than just give her patients a pill. Even though she saw the value in treating patients with drugs and surgery, she developed an interest in alternative treatments. She thinks that doctors need more tools in their toolboxes. In the year 2000, Dr. Juhlin underwent extensive training at Colorado State and became qualified with the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society. She also incorporated nutrition-based treatments into her practice. 

Since 75%-80% of the immune system is in the gut, Dr. Juhlin believes that nutrition is a very important part of treating animals. 

Dr. Juhlin is well versed in integrative medicine and uses acupuncture, therapeutic lasers, nutrition counseling, nutrition supplements, and herbal medicine to treat her patients. She also studied chiropractic at the Healing Oasis in Wisconsin.

She said she’s had a lot of success with laser therapy and that she goes above and beyond to treat her four-legged patients. 

In her spare time, Dr. Juhlin enjoys spending time with her family, including her dog Lucy.

Have a question about one of your fur kids? Download the Airvet app today and connect with a licensed veterinarian instantly. You might even get a chance to meet Dr. Juhlin.

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